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What is the connection between McCarthyism and the crucible?

What is the connection between McCarthyism and the crucible?

McCarthyism: Those who were accused were assumed guilty, put on trial, and expected to divulge the names of other Communist sympathizers. Failure to do so led to sanctions. The Crucible: Those who are accused are assumed guilty, put on trial, expected to confess, and expected to accuse others of being witches.

Who is McCarthy in the crucible?

“The Crucible,” a dramatization of the 1692 Salem witch trials, was written as an allegory for the “witch-hunt” atmosphere that pervaded America when Joseph McCarthy, a Republican representative from Wisconsin, led the nation on a search for communists in the American government.

What do we learn from the crucible?

The play was originally written as a direct criticism of McCarthyism, the practice of making accusations without proper regard for evidence. Therefore, the main idea of the play is to encourage people to remain calm during crisis situations and to not jump to the worst conclusions.

Who has the most power in the crucible Act 2?

Abigail Williams

How does the crucible relate to today?

The Crucible is basically a comparison between the Salem Witchcraft Trials and the Communist Red Scare. In modern times, most of the characters in the Crucible believe in a supernatural and their whole society is based on this theory. Religion is a very big part of each characters life, as it is today for most people.

What is the main theme of the crucible?

In The Crucible, the idea of goodness is a major theme. Almost every character is concerned with the concept of goodness, because their religion teaches them that the most important thing in life is how they will be judged by God after they die.

How does Reverend Hale abuse his power?

Reverend Hale He abused his power trying to save his reputation once he realized the mistakes he made when Abigail skipped town and took Parris money.

Why does Abigail have so much power?

Abigail has gained an enormous amount of power and authority since her introduction in Act 1, which means that she no longer has to worry as much about her reputation—anything negative that’s said about her she can lie about, and her word will be believed (as it is with Mary Warren).