What kind of shotgun do you use for duck hunting?

What kind of shotgun do you use for duck hunting?

Not surprisingly, many waterfowl hunters prefer to use a 20 gauge shotgun for their gun of choice. The 20 gauge is a lighter weapon than your typical 12 gauge. And it has less recoil when fired, which makes it a great choice for hunters that are younger or smaller in size.

How big is a 20 gauge duck gun?

The SX3 is available in wood, black synthetic and Mossy Oak’s waterfowl-worthy Shadow Grass Blades and new Break-Up Country camo patterns. It comes with 26- or 28-inch barrels and weighs around 6.5 to 6.75 pounds, depending on the model.

Is the 20 gauge shotgun a good gun?

But make no mistake, the 20-gauge is capable and versatile, bringing attributes into the field that none of its siblings can boast—whether you’re gunning for upland birds, ducks or big game. I’ve shot many 20-gauge shotguns over the years, leading me to appreciate them for what they are rather than for what they’re not.

Can a 20 gauge shotgun be used for waterfowl?

Twenty-gauge waterfowl guns are in right now. Once considered appropriate only for the small-framed and recoil-shy, they’re now a fad among waterfowlers of all sizes and experience levels. Some clubs require 20-gauges, on the theory that a slightly quieter report helps hold birds on their properties.

Not surprisingly, many waterfowl hunters prefer to use a 20 gauge shotgun for their gun of choice. The 20 gauge is a lighter weapon than your typical 12 gauge. And it has less recoil when fired, which makes it a great choice for hunters that are younger or smaller in size.

Why is the 20 gauge duck gun popular?

The 20-gauge duck gun is trending. Its increasing popularity may have more to do with an aging hunting population than with any ballistics breakthroughs, but I see and hear of more hunters taking 20s into the field now, using them to bag everything from teal to geese.

But make no mistake, the 20-gauge is capable and versatile, bringing attributes into the field that none of its siblings can boast—whether you’re gunning for upland birds, ducks or big game. I’ve shot many 20-gauge shotguns over the years, leading me to appreciate them for what they are rather than for what they’re not.

Twenty-gauge waterfowl guns are in right now. Once considered appropriate only for the small-framed and recoil-shy, they’re now a fad among waterfowlers of all sizes and experience levels. Some clubs require 20-gauges, on the theory that a slightly quieter report helps hold birds on their properties.