Can Equine Metabolic Syndrome be reversed?

Can Equine Metabolic Syndrome be reversed?

Thankfully, EMS can be reversed, but only with a lot of hard work. Horses with EMS are very, very hard to diet – so it takes real dedication to get the job done. It involves a serious permanent lifestyle change. Your vet and a nutritionist will help you plan a tailor-made diet for your horse.

How do you treat equine metabolic syndrome?

Equine metabolic syndrome is treated with dietary management in the form of non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) restriction, restriction of total calorie intake, and a reduction (grazing muzzle) or elimination of pasture access.

What are the signs of EMS?

One of the most common signs of EMS is the development of abnormal fat deposits (pockets/bulges/pads), usually seen around the crest, behind the shoulder, the rump (especially at the tail head) and above the eyes. Difficulty losing weight. Recurring episodes of acute laminitis. Increased drinking and urination.

Is equine metabolic syndrome like diabetes?

The term describes a common syndrome of obesity and predisposition to laminitis that affects horses and in particular ponies. The condition has similarities with human metabolic syndrome and Type II Diabetes. What causes EMS? A reduction in the normal response to insulin (insulin resistance) is central to EMS.

What do you feed a horse with equine metabolic syndrome?

If metabolic horses need to gain weight, calories should come from fat and fiber in the diet, not from soluble carbohydrates. This can be done through increasing hay or a low sugar/starch concentrate feed.

What time of day is the sugar content highest in grass?

afternoon
Sugar content of grasses is higher in the afternoon than in the morning and sugar content is lowest at night, so grazing should be restricted to the safest times of the day to graze, early morning and night times.

What do you feed a horse with metabolic syndrome?

Veterinarians should advise clients to:

  1. Avoid high-potassium feeds such as alfalfa hay, brome hay, canola oil, soybean meal or oil, and molasses.
  2. Feed timothy or Bermuda grass hay, beet pulp, or grains such as oats, corn, wheat and barley.
  3. Pasture is usually OK.
  4. Feed several times a day.
  5. Provide regular exercise.

What triggers EMS in horses?

EMS is caused when fat cells or adipose tissue produce high levels of adipokines, a protein hormone that leads to an increase in cortisol. As a result of the abnormal hormone production, a horse’s normal response to the hormone insulin is disrupted, resulting in high insulin and glucose blood concentrations.

What does metformin do in horses?

Metformin is a human drug prescribed for the treatment of type II diabetes mellitus. In humans, metformin reduces glucose absorption from the intestine and decreases the amount of glucose produced by the liver (gluconeogenesis). Metformin has been used in horses to counteract the effects of equine metabolic syndrome.

Is beet pulp good for metabolic horses?

Most metabolic horses need to LOSE weight. However, if your horse needs to GAIN weight, consider shredded beet pulp. Beet pulp has a very low glycemic index (does not cause spikes in blood sugar) and is relatively energy dense. If necessary you may substitute beet pulp at a rate of 1 lb.

How old do horses have to be to have equine metabolic syndrome?

It is very rare in Standardbred and Thoroughbred horses. Equine metabolic syndrome or EMS is most common in horses between the ages of 8 and 18 years. It is often confused with Cushing’s disease since insulin resistance is a symptom in both illnesses.

Is the pituitary gland normal in equine metabolic syndrome?

The pituitary gland is normal in younger horses with EMS, but lesions consistent with PPID may be found in older horses with EMS that are concurrently affected by EMS and PPID. Diagnostic testing for equine metabolic syndrome should concentrate on documenting insulin resistance while excluding PPID.

Which is a characteristic feature of equine metabolic syndrome?

Equine metabolic syndrome (EMS) is a characteristic collection of clinical signs and clinicopathologic changes in equids that places them at high risk for developing laminitis. Insulin dysregulation is the key feature of the syndrome. It is found in both horses and ponies and has also been recognized in donkeys.

How is equine metabolic syndrome similar to Cushings disease?

Equine Metabolic Syndrome. Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS), previously known as Peripheral Cushing’s Disease, is a hormonal disorder of horses, and more commonly ponies that has been identified in the recent past. It has some similarities with Cushing’s Disease, most notably in its propensity to cause laminitis.

How old do horses have to be to get equine metabolic syndrome?

Equine Metabolic Syndrome is triggered by the over-feeding of sugars and starches, usually combined with a lack of exercise and/or stress. Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS) is being diagnosed in record numbers with the median age of diagnosed horses a shockingly young 15 years old.

The pituitary gland is normal in younger horses with EMS, but lesions consistent with PPID may be found in older horses with EMS that are concurrently affected by EMS and PPID. Diagnostic testing for equine metabolic syndrome should concentrate on documenting insulin resistance while excluding PPID.

Equine metabolic syndrome (EMS) is a characteristic collection of clinical signs and clinicopathologic changes in equids that places them at high risk for developing laminitis. Insulin dysregulation is the key feature of the syndrome. It is found in both horses and ponies and has also been recognized in donkeys.

Equine Metabolic Syndrome. Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS), previously known as Peripheral Cushing’s Disease, is a hormonal disorder of horses, and more commonly ponies that has been identified in the recent past. It has some similarities with Cushing’s Disease, most notably in its propensity to cause laminitis.